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Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Discourse 343. To Niger Republic In Search of Aisha

Discourse 343
By Dr. Aliyu U. Tilde

To Niger Republic In Search of Aisha

The road to Aisha was not straight. In fact, just an hour before I finally met her, I almost lost any hope of our union. But when I met her finally, the toil proved to be worth undertaking.

The first difficulty was caused by my fading memory. Before I could find her I had to find Tchima Illa Issoufou, the BBC correspondent in Maradi who aired the voice of Aisha in a report on food shortage last March. As I tried to remember her particulars which Tchima mentioned at the end of the report, I mistakenly thought she said Aisha came from Unguwar Hardo outside Damagaran.

So I set out for Damagaran – or Zinder, as the French call it – very early in the morning through Bauchi, Dutse, Gumel and then Babura. I crossed the border at Babban Mutum and reached Damagaran through Magarya an hour before sunset. The road was not good, I must say, though it was far better than what I am used to between Jos and Saminaka. The shallow potholes, though numerous, were filled with sand unlike the car-swallowing ones we have on some Nigerian roads.

At Radio Amfani in Damagaran, I was told that Tchima lives in Maradi, not Damagaran. A colleague of her was able to connect the two of us on phone. I then booked an appointment with her against the following morning. And so without much waste of time, I was out of Zinder chasing the sun on my way to Maradi, though the red star did not take time before it disappeared from my sight altogether. The road was perfect except for the bumps that are located at every settlement along the 300 km stretch. By the time I checked into Jangwarzo Hotel in Maradi around 9.00pm, I discovered that I have covered a distance of 930km that day.

The following day, as I was discussing with some officials at Universite de Maradi, Tchima called and together we went to pick a female friend of hers, Rakiya of Radio Amfani, who would later prove to be very useful in locating Aisha. Tchima would readily confess that she is not good with directions, something that her friend Rakiya does with fascinating ease. Tchima on her part could recall fine details of conversations and faces with an amazing accuracy, as we will see shortly. The two makes a perfect company for any one in search of Aisha under the prevailing circumstance.

Together we left Maradi that afternoon for Gidan Hardo Isa which is in Hawan Dawaki ward. We left the Maradi-Zinder road at Gazaoua (Gazawa) and drove along the quiet laterite road until we reached Hawan Dawaki, at every point guided by the good senses of Rakiya to whom we conceded defeat in any argument regarding direction. It was in this village that Tchima interviewed Aisha and her friends a year ago when they came in the entourage of the President. From there we were guided to remoter village south east of the Gazaoua-Maiadua road.

At Tuburtu, a person I thought was old enough to know Hardo Isa said there was nobody with that name among all the Fulani settlements around. I returned to the car and told my already tired co-travellers, “Il y a une probleme”. However, the old man was kind enough to direct us to a settlement where the oldest Fulani leader around lives. I left Tchima and Rakiya in the car and trekked about a kilometre away where I met Hardo Jibgau in his hat. He counted, and my heart started racing in despair, all the five hardos in the area and said there was only one Hardo Isa. Mentioning Isa immediately rekindled the hope of locating Aisha. He described the site for his son who volunteered to lead us there. After promising Jibgau that i will look for his sister Rabi, the mother of Hardo Ango at Gadan Maiwa in Bauchi state where he once lived, we returned to the car and drove through the narrow sandy path until we arrived at Hardo Isa quarters. Aisha must be living in one of them, we hoped.

The quarters are sparse. Like other Fulani quarters, they form a group of houses separated from one another by distances that could be as wide as 500 meters. Before we could even pull the brakes, there was Tchima at her best: from afar she amazingly spotted one of the women, Fatouma, that were with Aisha the day she interviewed them. We approached the woman who was processing some guinea corn in a motar.

First, the apprehensive Fatouma denied being at the spot of the interview that day. She did not even go to the event, she claimed. Tchima and Rakiya tried hard to describe Aisha to her but she declined knowing anyone like that. Aisha did not help matters either. She did not give Tchima her actual name during the interview. However, as the women realized that we were not there to bring any trouble, they opened up and named Aisha, pointing at her house, some 300 meters away. They sent for her and she arrived shortly. Tchima instantly recognized her. As she sat on an empty mortar to answer Tchima, the clear voice of Aisha as it was aired on BBC hit my ears unmistakably.

Aisha is middle-aged, dark, slim and medium in height. She is a guest every journalist would like to host. She is not shy to speak her mind, eloquently and frankly. Yet, when she spoke to Tchima about the food shortage they were facing last year, she was kind enough to acknowledge the effort of government in distributing foodstuff even though she was yet to receive any personally. What was more interesting in that interview was how she kept on entrusting her hope in God, “E. Ana rabawa amma mu Allah bai ciyar damu ba tukun”. What a good citizen! And God did not fail her. He did not wait much after the interview was aired to answer her prayer as well as that of others around her in Gidan Hardo Isa.

The following forty minutes we spent there before we started our return trip to Maradi were among the happiest moments one could experience in life. It is fascinating to see other people happy, especially when something good visits them unexpectedly. A unique blend of joy and gratitude remarkably changed their faces before us and I had to fight hard to suppress the tears their happiness instigated in my eyes. God is gracious. Very gracious. Whatever little aid we took to them was from Him. We remain grateful to Him for the opportunity.

We bade the residents of Gidan Hardo Isa farewell amidst the joy that surrounded their homes. You would think Zaytouna, the teenage girl of Aisha, would jump into the car out of sheer happiness. As we drove back to Maradi, the eastern sky had better news for the inhabitants of that region of the Sahel. Rains fell just before sunset. And by the time I went to bed in Maradi, they have arrived at the regional capital in considerable quantity to make the rest of the night enjoyably cool for our sleep.

Throughout my visit, I was delighted by the development and orderliness of Niger. If the Ghana I saw in 2007 had given me the hope that Africans can achieve good governance different from what obtains in Nigeria, Niger brought that message closer home because of its proximity and our cultural affinity. Niger is no longer a country of hunger and underdevelopment as the media portrays it. Of course, shortage of rains will contnue to be a problem in the Sahel but the country is increasingly becomng adept in facing the challenge.

What is more interesting is how the contrast with Nigeria would bring out Niger as a true jewel of the Sahel. Right from the first village after the Babban Mutum border, one cannot fail to discern the difference. "With their opposites, things become clear," said Al-Mutanabbi.

Their primary schools, except those built by communities – and all public buildings for that matter – are built to an impeccable standard. The nearest types of structures in Nigeria to which one could compare the official primary school buildings I saw in their villages are those built here by professional companies like Julius Berger. Even their very large and numerous agricultural stores have defied the instable earth and violent winds of the Sahel. They stand rigid and intact. Contrast this with the subhuman standard classrooms in both our public and private schools, the vandalized and empty stores that were mercilessly stripped of their fittings and roofs by the gluttony of thieving officials, etc.

The student/teacher ratio is small in all the schools I visited. I have not seen any classroom holding under shade. The same children go to school morning and afternoon, including Saturdays as it used to be here in the 1960s. There are sufficient instructional materials and the standard of learning is really high compared to ours. The Primary III children I met at Gurguji, some kilometers away from Magarya, were reading and writing composition in French. On the other side of the border, it is not uncommon to find Nigerian children in SS III who cannot make a single sentence in English – after 12 years of seducation.

The comparison is the same even on matters of governance. Nigeriennes - commoners and elites alike – that I spoke to are unanimous on one point: that ‘doka’ – or rule of law – is the fundamental difference between their country and Nigeria. Niger is where one can say nobody is above the law and readily win a nod. Officials do not engage in the bizarre corrupt practices that take place in Nigeria with impunity. They have a genuine patriotism for their country.

Officials in Niger have direct contact with their people and they show remarkable concern for any plight that might visit them. Officials, including the President, convene ‘town hall’ meetings even in the remotest areas. In fact, the reason why we learn about their food shortage is precisely because the government is concerned about the welfare of its citizens. There are millions of Nigerians under similar circumstance but I have never heard of any effort by government to provide food for them and their livestock. Who cares in Nigeria if you or your cow would die of hunger? Even the “fuji” or cattle vaccinations exercises that were common up to the 1960s have completely disappeared. And when the vaccinations are done in order to patronize a party official, they are counted as a favour to the herdsmen.

Millions of our children are malnourished in Nigeria; we lose hundreds of thousands of cattle to hunger annually. But the world does not know about our hunger for two reasons: one, hunger is the last thing the world would expects to exist in a leading OPEC country and, two, Nigerian officials are too wicked to give it a damn. By contrast, government in Niger knows that its population would take it to task on any lapse, more so if there were reports of animals dying of hunger. The government too is responsive and does not pretend that it is rich. If a cry would bring assistance from donors, it is ready to do it loudly. And it does not wait for them. Along the way to Hawan Dawaki, Rakiya keenly showed me what they called "demi lun". As the name applies, these are half moon basins which government pays villagers to dig on vast areas and plant them with drought tolerant grasses. The ones we saw along the way to Hawan Dawaki were still not harvested, indicating that the cattle, as we saw them, will escape the lethal effect of the drought this year.

The present government in Niger is particularly doing well. Throughout the regions of Zinder and Maradi, there is a common sight of trucks carrying food and animal feed to stores and people in the hinterland. A journalist that is critical of the regime confided in me that if this dry season passes without significant incidents of human and animal deaths, he would lead a delegation of his colleagues to commend the President in Niamey. President Mohammed Isoufou is not waiting for them. He is already trying his best to fulfill his campaign promises. He promised building 2,500 classrooms annually throughout his tenure, for example. In his first year that just ended, he has built 2,800. This is remarkable in a country with just a population of 15 million and which is regarded among the poorest in Africa. At the peak of the recent fuel subsidy crisis, by contrast, the federal government in Nigeria promised to put thousands of buses on the roads of Nigerians cities. Nothing came out of that simple promise. How much would it take to buy a bus in a country that receives billions of naira daily as rent from oil companies?

The result of the responsiveness of government and its resolve to institute rule of law is the prevailing atmosphere of security and peace. The governor of Maradi, Sidi Mohamed, drives around his capital city freely. I saw the richest person in the region, Umaru Laouli Gago, driving in the city alone in his car. And when night falls, I am sure both will go to their houses and sleep quietly. Nigerian governors cannot dare drive around their capitals without a coterie of hostile and trigger happy security personnel. In fact, mine is reported to have requested his House of Assembly to allow him officially relocate to Abuja. It refused. If he would come to town, it may be once a month or less, since Boko Haram placed him on its hit list in spite of his apology. In the Southeast and South-south, the rich have resorted to residing in hotels, for fear of abduction by kidnappers or attack by armed robbers. Of what worth is our wealth?

Now, there are no go areas even for the Nigerian president, like Eagle Square that is just a kilometre away from Aso Villa, many places in Abuja and security risk states like Borno. By contrast, the President of Niger travels to very remote areas to meet his people and pass the night along with his ministers in mobile tents pitched in open air. I remembered the story of Kusroe's (Persian) messenger who was shocked to meet the second caliph, Umar Bin Al-Khattab, taking a nap under a tree in the outskirts of Medina, alone without any guard, when his domain had already encompassed the entire Arabia, Syria and Palestine. He said, “I wish my King will enjoy the same level of tranquillity!” I also wish to see President Goodluck Jonathan’s campaign train in Tilde one day where he will pass the night in a tent at the foot of the Shere Hills. Hahahahaha…

As a result of rule of law also, Niger is one fo the democracies to beat in Africa. Tchima told me that if there is any manipulation, it could only take place before balloting. But once the ballot is cast, nobody can change the result. Results are announced instantly at polling station and agents are given their copies of the return sheets. Every party collates its results independently at its situation room. Immediately the pattern shows the winner that would emerge, Tchima assured me, other candidates would call that candidate on phone to concede defeat and congratulate him or her. “Shi ke nan,” she said, waiving her hands as we drove towards the Jibiya border.

That is Niger, with its scant resources and population. And here is Nigeria, with over a hundred billion naira spent on elections, with a PhD as President, with hundred times more policemen than those in Niger, with thousands of election officials that include numerous professors and PhDs as returning officers, with thousands of magistrates and justices, and with thousands of lawyers. Yet, we cannot afford to be honest enough to conduct a single credible election. What a shame!

The reason is simple. The Qur'an says, “Say, the bad and the good cannot be equal even if the quantity of the bad has amazed you. So fear God, Oh people of talent, such that you can succeed.”

It was then I realised the stupidity in the idea I put across to Aisha back in Gidan Hardo Isa the previous evening. I asked her why they would not just cross over to Nigeria where there is enough grass for their cattle and arable land to grow crops. She said they prefer to remain in Niger in spite of the difficulties. “If we leave, to whom do we abandon this place: these huts, this fence, this land? Let our men go and search for whatever they could get for us. But here we shall remain.”

More oil is discovered in the Sahel. Definitely, Niger will get rich in the next two decades. I told Tchima that I am afriad that the grip of the state on the affairs of the country may become loose. She disagreed, averring that more resources will be committed to law enforcement comensurate with the challenges. After two days of discussion, I conceded that Niger will face the challenge of wealth squarely, given the long experience it has in French style of administration and the blessing of learning from the bad experience of its 'oil rich’ southern neighbour.

In the end, I returned home pleased with my union with Aisha and her people, and, more importantly, with the first hand knowledge that our northern neighbour is not as poor as we think. It is developing fast; its riches are increasing by the day; and its people are proud of it. Its people are Africans too, except that they believe in rule of law. With it, their future would certainly be better than ours. I cannot help but wish them success.

If any of my readers, any student of law or any Nigerian official wants to breathe the air of rule of law, he or she may not need to visit far away Europe or America. Niger is closeby. That was the prayer of the late Mamman Shata before his benefactor, the late Emir of Daura, Alhaji Muhammadu Bashar. Hear him in the famous LP, Kwana Lafiya Mai Daura:

“In kasar waje ta yi nisa Mamman
Nan kusa ma kamar nan Nijer
In ga Magarya, jikan Abdu
Kai ni Damagaran, dan Sanda
Sannan sai ka kai ni Maradi
In kwana in gaida Sarki Buzu.”

By sheer coincidence, not by the design of my pocket - unlike Shata, this was the same route I took in search of Habiba few days ago and forty-one years after I heard that song for the first time as a primary school child.

As I bade Tchima farewell at the border and thanked her for her invaluable help, I was immediately greeted on the Nigerian side before I drove into Katsina by sights of blown roofs of newly built classrooms, by a large acreage of firewood bales (not a single piece have I seen sold by the roadside in Niger), by police and soldiers soliciting for tips even under the current security situation, by bare walls of stores that used to harbour tonnes of fertilizer and other agric inputs, and by a people each left to his own devices.
I was definitely back to Nigeria, my one and only country, the land of religion without faith, of nothing amidst plenty, of poverty amidst wealth, of ignorance amidst knowledge, of impunity amidst laws, and of dictatorship amidst democracy.


Bauchi
8 May 2012

44 comments:

Muhammad Shafiu Ibrahim said...

Lallai kasha hanya, Allah Ya biyaka.

Mr. P to spent a night at Shere Hills, . . . wonderfull imagination

Abdul Danja said...

What an experience. How i wish you were accompanied by one your governors side kick, atleast he will report to his principal how to go about his duty without songs and music.

alkali gambo said...

You are right on security and order in Niger. I was there last December with friends. We travelled from Maradi to Niamey, the capital arriving our destination at 1:00 a.m. You can't travel in Nigeria at that hour without being harassed or killed.

Keem said...

Ghana has left us behind,
Republic of Benin is getting better,
Niger is growing steadily...when are we going to get it right?
Dr Aliyu Tilde, jazakallah for this wonderful piece.

Keem said...

That would be the day.

Anonymous said...

Dr. I run short of words to make comments from I just read from you. I magine that Niger Republic is ahead of my country Nigeria in terms of Democracy, good governance, law and order to mentioned but few. Very sad indeed.I am looking forward the day when Nigerians the leaders and followers, haves and haves not will be sleeping with two eyes closed

Anonymous said...

Doctor,
Wallahi irin yadda kafada din nan is just exactly how my feeling always is any time iam opportuned to travelled to other part of the world, especially african countries; and i discovered that the places we lookdown at are far better than us in terms of organisation, orderliness and patriotism. Always a visit to such places will leave you pitying yourself and your country for the retrogression going on at your own country despite the seeming wealth at your disposal. You most often end up agreeing  with those who opined that our oil wealth was a curse on us as it robbed us of all civilised nortions and bankrupted us both in character and in our patriotic zeal. I once travelled to Congo brazevelle and what i saw and witnessed there was so amazing. To start with throughout my stay i did not witness any power failure despite the fact that the country had just came out of a bitter war with bullets scars on all buildings around the capital, yet everything is working perfectly well; I said everything from the taxi i took at the airport to the hotel i stayed to the market place all appears calm and orderly. And as i said even though the country had just came out of a bitter war, but believe me everything is going well. believe me you don't need to be told as it is clearly noticeable that Law and order are in place and are well entreched. there is no any sacred cow or any outlawed -who is believed to be above the law. Everything is working accordingly and no one seemed to be behaving in that arrogant manner you witness with our officials. The most amazing thing is the way the president appears at an all night party opposite our hotel where they were holding a party becouse of the death of the wife of their senete ( or speaker- forgot which one) who had died and were doing wakekeeping, we all came out and enjoyed the local songs and dances,mixing with the locals and even recording with our cameras infront of the diginitaries with  no one; and indeed nobody harrising us or paying any paticular attention at us or any other else let alone molest or arrest us, the place was jam packed but no sign of any gun toughting security to harrass the large audience. we all lamented and cried out our heart loud immagining what the situation would have been had the event happening in nigeria. If that were taking place in Nigeria, even the hotel would have been closed becouse the president is attending.
Harkar nigeria sai hakuri da addu'a Allah yayi mana agaji.
MSMS

Kafin-Gana said...

Allah Ya karbi wannan ayyukan da kayi

Anonymous said...

Dr Tilde

Allah yasaka da alkhairinsa, yaqara budi, yakuma kula da bayanku. Mukuma Allah yasa mukoya daga gareku, muma mudora daga inda kuka tsaya. Sukuma shugabannin mu Allah yashiryesu inmasu shiryuwane, inkuma sabanin hakane ya ilahil alamina ka musanyamana dana gari, ka yafemu

Saleh Abdullahi said...

May Allah accept yur trip as act of worship & purify the aid you rendered to the noticeable needies.
And, for Nigeria's disheartening situations, 'qalu inna lilLahi wa inna ilaiHi raji'un'.

Anonymous said...

Welldone Dr, surely with the bunch of rogues parading as rulers sorry Naija

Hikima said...

Tilden Bauchi!

Abubakar Sadiiq said...

Dr. Well come back home. It has been a real and wonderful trip you courageously set out for and I take this to thank you for sharing this great knowledge. Actually, I like the comparative analyses of the two neighbouring countries, Niger and Nigeria. Indeed, a nice discourse Dr.

Abubakar Sadiiq said...

Well come back home Dr. Tilde.
It has been a wonderful trip you courageously set out for and I take this to thank you for sharing this great knowledge with me. Honestly, I have enjoyed and the comparative analyses of the two neighbouring countries, Niger and Nigeria in all aspects you discussed it. I like it. In fact, I have ever read a nice discourse! More grease to your elbow. May Allaah keep guiding you to this brave task. Salaam 'alaikum.

Salisu Shehu BUK blogspot said...

salam and well done. a very interesting reading that increases your curiosity and engages and excites you, preventing from stopping midway until you reach the end of the story. At first I thought you were on a project to trace a particular fulbe trjectory, but i later realized, even more amazingly that you were on a rescue ala' humanitarian mission. Allah windu baraji. What may most glarinly express or demonstrate my amazement was perhaps, to tell you that you have a conductor (KWANDASTA) when next you are unto another voyage.

As for the comparison between Nigeria and Niger, I wished you cared to observe the importation of the Nigeriene oil to Nigeria and how it has started to bring some form of relief to our citizens around the border. As some colleague rightly and also aptly stated, this factor has already started asserting itself as a salvation route to the core northen states.
Salisu Shehu, BUK.

saa said...

Dr, as usual I read with pain how others have left us behind.Unfortunately the RULERS refuse to hear

Anonymous said...

"Lefin dadi karewa" what a fascinatng story! Hw I wshd I was in your company 2 visit dis wonderful land. Allah kabamu shugabanni nagari a kasata Nigeria.

Abubakar Suleiman said...

My dear Doctor Tilde--Thank you very much for the inspiring Discourse..Allah will continue to protect and guide you for the patrotic zeal in analysing situations point blank.Hope our leaders and would be leaders are following all the postings..Our major problem in Nigeria is Non-adherence to the "RULE OF LAW".

Engr. Abdurrazaq Nakore said...

Doctor, the reality is that the Sahara Desert is fast encroaching into southern Niger and northern Nigeria causing droughts and accompanying famine especially in Niger. This is what is responsible for poor harvests leading to famine. Despite the rule of law and more apparent transparency , I wonder what the authorities in Niger are doing to tackle the menance of annual short fall in rains?

Anonymous said...

Dr. welkom back! To remind you of ur promise to hardo, pls go to gadan maiwa now.

Anonymous said...

Well educated piece. Next carry yuguda or firauna shema to accompany you.

sani mudi said...

Salam Dr. Only that u did not notify me of your intention to visit Niger republic, esp the areas mentioned, during our last meeting in Jos. I would have siezed the opportunity to fulfill a promise i made to my good host, the Sarkin shanun Damagaram, to return and enjoy the warm hospitality of the people and the tranquility in Niger. I concur with you on all you ve said about the state of affairs in Niger republic as of today and recommend it as suitable place for holiday and learning the art of modesty,good governance that meets the yearnings of the citizenry. no wonder the country has shamed those who thought that with the collapse of Gaddafi regime in Libya there would be chaos in Niger.

Anonymous said...

Dr, this is awesome, very true and sad to note that a country that is supposed to be leading by example is that which everyone is cursing. Please let others share how Nigerians are treated in other African countries, that we have enough to make Africa proud but rudiculed by un-patriotic self centered leaders. Join me in prayers to help Niger republic like Ghana within a decade. Thank you for sharing your trip sir.

Jaafar Ahmad said...

Salam,
Thank you Dr. for this inspiring discourse. Since my primary school days, I knew Niger to be as you said in your discussion. I remembered fine clothing materials, yams, milk and many other things that came from Niger whenever my father or any other relation travels there. A very law abiding country, peaceful and a tourist attraction for all beholders. May Allah help our situation, give us good leaders, make us all to be law abiding, be our brothers & sisters keepers. May He also bring to an end the insecurity, series of calamities in our dear country. We continue to pray and await the favours of Allah (SWT). Thank you and Good bless you Dr Tilde.

Olajidebello said...

This is humbling. Your pellucid analysis is commendable. I shall broadcast this from the roofs...

Ibrahim Barkindo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ibrahim Barkindo said...

JazakalLahu khairan Dr., Allah ya saka da alhairi. a lot of people expressed that they wish they were with oyu on the trip. then why not organize another trip as tour and carry all along, including me. Dr. Salisu Shenu will bear my fees. we can tour Niger, Cameroun, Chad and Benin and everybidy knows that theses countries are far ahead of NIgeria in all the things you have mentioned.I think it is not a crazy idea. Salam wa jazakalLah.

Ibrahim Barkindo said...

very interesting. this is a real challenge

Ali Ben Musa said...

Doc,your hosts in Niger have taught us two lessons:
1.With integrity you have nothing to fear,since you have nothing to hide.With integrity you will do the right thing,so you will have no guilt.With fear and guilt removed you are free to be and do your best.
2.You can get everything money will buy without a lick of character,but you can't get any of the things money won't buy-happiness,peace of mind,relationships,etc,without character.

Abdulhamid Maina said...

Such an inspirational piece, tears near drop from my eyes. I am afraid it might be God makes our country to be an example as you have said “ the land of religion without faith, of nothing amidst plenty, of poverty amidst wealth, of ignorance amidst knowledge, of impunity amidst laws, and of dictatorship amidst democracy.” Because our country’s problems are somehow unique in the sense of decadence.

Muhd Basheer Yahya said...

Well done for that "James Hardley Chase" account of your humanitarian trip. One hopes that those heartless leaders will listen and get it right. Whenever a person travels out of Nigeria, the bizarre feeling of repudiating one's citizenship readily comes to mind. At the risk of sounding despondent, one question that I always ask myself is "are we really interested in getting it right here in Nigeria?" Nigeria we hail thee!

A.B. Ibrahim said...

Dr. Please did you find out in Niger whether they do have in their menu Amala, Akpu, Tuwon Shinkafa, Pomo, Eba, pounded yam, idikayiko, snail, dog meat, horse meat, donkey meat, grass cutter, bat meat, bush meat, palm wine, nkainkai, shaki, roundabout, dambu, kilishi, tsire, burkutu, fura..........? If they do, I bet you my life they wouldn't have been as organized, law abiding and patriotic. Next time confirm my thiesis if you visit Niger.

Hauwa H said...

"I also wish to see President Goodluck Jonathan’s campaign train in Tilde one day where he will pass the night in a tent at the foot of the Shere Hills. Hahahahaha…"it will be a cold day in hell before that hpns lwkmd-

Anonymous said...

May Allah show us when Nigeria too begins to take the right direction

Anonymous said...

Well done doctor, more grease to your elbows

Anonymous said...

Very illuminating. Allah Yayi sakamako mafi alheri bisa daukin da aka kaiwa bayinSa

Anonymous said...

A true sacrifice will never be forgotten.It pays itself forward.
May God bless you, always.

Baban Shareek said...

What a wonderful piece..
This is one of your best so far. Your mastery of story telling is quite commendable. Thank you for sharing this with us.

Anonymous said...

Thank you Dr. Tilde for this educative piece. It remains to be seen what lesson we Nigerians may drive from it. One lesson I read from the story is that money or wealth alone does not make a great nation. Nigeria has all the walth and natural endowments but its people are living in poverty. Why? Because we lack the capacity to manage our affirs faithfully, sincerely and selflesslessly. In short we have no sesnse of decency in our conducts - at least majority of us.

Anonymous said...

A nice piece of article. I have heard a lot about Niger especially as regards their patriotism and love for their country. You hardly hear of issues bordering on ethnicity, religious intolerance, electoral riggings and corruption. May God guide our beloved country such that one day we become a reference point.

The piece on visit to Aisha has greatly motivated me to pay a short visit to Niger.

Muhammad Shafiu Ibrahim said...

I hope so

Yes said...

I weep for Nigeria!

Abdulkareem said...

I hailed from jibia, Katsina state Nigeria I confirmed all that Dr has said. Go to the traffic control lights they have and see law of road safety corps.and order. But but come to katsina after installation see how ppl wan to violate these simple rules in the prese.ce

Abdulkareem said...

Abin kunya may Allah swt salvage us from our unpatriotic rulers and followers. Cos rigging may not happen without. Tha help of some unpatriotic Nigerians.